Today in Labor History – August 26th

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United Mine Worker (UMW) organizer Fannie Sellins was gunned down by company bought sheriffs during a Pennsylvania coal strike along with Joseph Starzeleski. Sellins had helped organize the garment workers before moving on to help the coal miners– 1919

After three-quarters of the states had ratified the 19th Amendment to the Constitution, women win their long struggle for the vote – 1920

With America in the depths of the Great Depression, the Comptroller of the Currency announces a temporary halt on foreclosures of first mortgages – 1932

In what some may consider one of the many management decisions that was to help cripple the American auto industry over the following decades, Ford Motor Co. produces its first Edsel. Ford dropped the project two years later after losing approximately $350 million – 1957

The Women’s Strike for Equality is staged in cities across the U.S., marking the 50th anniversary of the passage of the 19th amendment, under which women won the right to vote.  A key focus of the strike—in fact, more accurately a series of marches and demonstrations—was equality in the workplace.  An estimated  20,000 women participated, some carrying signs with the iconic slogan, “Don’t Iron While the Strike is Hot.”  Another sign: “Hardhats for Soft Broads” – 1970

More than 1,300 bus drivers on Oahu, Hawaii, begin what is to become a 5-week strike – 2003

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