Today in Labor History – March 3rd
William Green was born on this date in Coshocton, Ohio. He was a coal miner who succeeded Samuel Gompers as
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Today in Labor History – March 2nd
Congress abolished the African slave trade. The first American slave ship, Desire, sailed from Marblehead, Massachusetts in 1637. Since then,
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Today in Labor History – March 1st
The Granite Cutters National Union began what was to be a successful nationwide strike for the 8-hour day. Also won:
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Today in Labor History – February 28th (and 29th)
The U.S. Supreme Court found that a Utah state law limiting mine and smelter workers to an eight-hour workday was
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Today in Labor History – February 27th
Legendary labor leader and socialist presidential candidate Eugene V. Debs became a charter member and secretary of the Vigo Lodge,
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Today in Labor History – February 26th
Congress okayed the Contract Labor Law, designed to clamp down on “business agents” who contracted abroad for immigrant labor. One
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Today in Labor History – February 25th
The Paterson, New Jersey silk strike began, with 25,000 immigrant textile workers walking out when mill owners doubled the size
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Today in Labor History – February 24th
The U.S. Supreme Court ruled in Muller v. Oregon to uphold the state’s restrictions on the working hours of women,
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Today in Labor History – February 23rd
19-year-old Irish immigrant Kate Mullany led members of the Collar Laundry Union, the first all-female union in the United States,
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Today in Labor History – February 22nd
3,000 union shoemakers on strike in Lynn, Massachusetts met to form committees and appoint guards to prevent violence and keep
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