Today in Labor History – March 17th

The leadership of the American Federation of Labor selected the Carpenters Union to lead the eight hour movement. Carpenters throughout the country struck in April; by May 1, some 46,000 carpenters in 137 cities and towns had achieved shorter hours. – 1890 A U.S.-China treaty prevented Chinese laborers from entering the U.S. – 1894 Nearly […]

Today in Labor History – March 16th

Refusing to accept a 9-cent wage increase, the United Packinghouse Workers of America initiated a nationwide strike against meatpacking companies Swift, Armour, Cudahy, Wilson, Morrell, and others. Packinghouse workers shut down 140 plants around the country. – 1948 The United Federation of Teachers (UFT) was formed in New York to represent New York City public […]

Today in Labor History – March 15th

Ben Fletcher, African-American IWW organizer, was born on this date. Fletcher organized longshoremen in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. – 1877 The International Union of Painters and Allied Trades was founded on this date. Today they represent more than 140,000 members in the construction industry, such as Painters, Drywall Finishers, Glaziers, Floor Coverers, and Sign and Display workers. […]

Today in Labor History – March 12th

Greedy industrialist turned benevolent philanthropist Andrew Carnegie pledged $5.2 million for the construction of 65 branch libraries in New York City, barely 1 percent of his net worth at the time. He established more than 2,500 libraries between 1900 and 1919, following years of treating workers in his steel plants brutally, demanding long hours in […]