Today in Labor History – April 21st

Bituminous coal miners across the country went on strike over wage cuts. The nationwide strike was met with violence from scabs, company security, sheriff’s deputies, and the National Guard. It ended in eight weeks and severely weakened the United Mine Workers of America, which had been founded just four years earlier. – 1894 Company guards […]

Today in Labor History – April 20th

10,000 demonstrators celebrated textile workers’ win of a 10-percent pay hike and grievance committees after a one-month strike in Lowell, Massachusetts. – 1912 The Ludlow Massacre occurred in Colorado. National Guards opened fire on a mining camp during a strike in Ludlow, Colorado, killing five miners, two women, and twelve children. By the end of […]

Today in Labor History – April 19th

More than 6,000 furniture workers went on strike in Grand Rapids, Michigan, over hours, wages, working conditions, and the right to bargain collectively. The strike – which affected nearly all of the 60+ furniture manufacturers in the city – lasted throughout the summer, bringing much of the city to a standstill for four months. A […]

Today in Labor History – April 18th

Clarence Darrow was born. Darrow was the lawyer who defended Eugene V. Debs and the Wobblies, as well as John Scopes, the teacher who was prosecuted for teaching evolution in the famous “Scopes Monkey Trial”. – 1857 Canada’s Prime Minister Sir John Macdonald introduced the Trade Union Act to legalize unions in the country. Two […]

Today in Labor History – April 16th

Jacob Coxey was born on this date in Massillon, Ohio. Coxey, a populist businessman, proposed ending the 1893 depression by issuing Treasury notes to pay for a work-relief program. When Congress refused to pass his bill, Coxey led an “Army of the Poor” from Ohio to Washington, DC, where Coxey and his lieutenants were arrested […]