Today in Labor History – October 6th

labor history october 6

The First National Conference of Trade Union Women was held on this date. – 1918

“The Jazz Singer”, this country’s first feature-length sound film, opened in New York City. Within three years, 22,000 theater jobs for musicians who accompanied silent films were lost, while only a few hundred jobs for musicians performing on soundtracks were created by the new technology. – 1927

1,700 female flight attendants won an 18-year, $37 million suit against United Airlines. They had been fired for getting married. – 1986

Thirty-two thousand machinists began what was to be a successful 69-day strike against the Boeing Company featuring pay increases that averaged an estimated $19,200 in wages and benefits over four years and safeguarded against job cutbacks. – 1995

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