Today in Labor History – November 19th

6,000 members of the United Garment Workers of America struck at 27 wholesale houses in Chicago, which were then members of the National Wholesale Tailors’ Association. – 1904

[bctt tweet=”Joe Hill, IWW organizer and songwriter was executed by a Utah firing squad after being convicted of murder on trumped-up charges.” username=”VoicesOfLabor”] While in prison, Hill sent a telegram to IWW leader Big Bill Haywood: “Goodbye Bill. I die like a true blue rebel. Don’t waste any time in mourning. Organize!” In a later telegram, he added, “Could you arrange to have my body hauled to the state line to be buried? I don’t want to be found dead in Utah. His ashes were supposedly sprinkled in every state of the union, except Utah. However, it is said that the IWW still keeps a small vial of some of his remaining ashes.  – 1915

The nation’s first automatic toll collection machine was used at the Union Toll Plaza on New Jersey’s Garden State Parkway. – 1954

The National Writers Union was founded, representing freelance and contract writers and others in the trade. In 1992 it merged into and became a local of the United Auto Workers. – 1981

Visit the Voices of Labor Online Store

 

Join our Mailing list!
Be the first to get information on new books, labor
news, Labor History shorts, and maybe a cat photo or two.
And for joining, I'll give you a little gift, a
Solidarity Forever Ringtone

You have successfully subscribed to our mail list.

Too many subscribe attempts for this email address.