Today in Labor History September 13th

Attica Prison

The Post Office Department ordered 25,000 railway mail clerks to shoot to kill any bandits attempting to rob the mail. – 1926

Three workers died during a strike in Woonsocket, Rhode Island, fighting for a minimum wage for textile workers. Over the course of September, more than 420,000 workers joined the strike. – 1934

[click_to_tweet tweet=”Three die  in Woonsocket textile strike, a thousand National Guardsmen, state troopers and local police store Attica, 34 inmates and 9 AFSCME guards died.” quote=”Three die  in Woonsocket textile strike, a thousand National Guardsmen, state troopers and local police store Attica, 34 inmates and 9 AFSCME guards died.”]

One thousand National Guardsmen, State Troopers, and local police stormed Attica Prison in New York, after a breakdown in negotiations between officials and prisoners. Governor Rockefeller ordered the attack after a four-day revolt at the prison. Prisoners were demanding political rights and better living conditions. The assault wounded 89 and resulted in the deaths of 34 inmates and nine AFSCME guards who were hostages. – 1971

Support us on Patreon at patreon.com/voicesoflabor

 

Join our Mailing list!
Be the first to get information on new books, labor
news, Labor History shorts, and maybe a cat photo or two.
And for joining, I'll give you a little gift, a
Solidarity Forever Ringtone

You have successfully subscribed to our mail list.

Too many subscribe attempts for this email address.