Today in Labor History – May 28th
The Ladies Shoe Binders Society formed in New York. – 1835 The first American law prohibiting employment of women was
Read more.
Today in Labor History – May 27th
The U.S. Supreme Court declared the Depression-era National Industrial Recovery Act to be unconstitutional, about a month before it was
Read more.
Today in Labor History – May 26th
Men and women weavers in Pawtucket, Rhode Island staged the nation’s first “co-ed” strike. – 1824 The Western Federation of
Read more.
Today in Labor History – May 25th
Pressured by employers, striking shoemakers in Philadelphia were arrested and charged with criminal conspiracy for violating an English common law
Read more.
Today in Labor History – May 24th
After 14 years of construction and the deaths of 27 workers, the Brooklyn Bridge over New York’s East River opened.
Read more.
Today in Labor History – May 23rd
The first American nursery school was established in New York City as a way to “relieve parents of the laboring
Read more.
Today in Labor History – May 22nd
Eugene Debs was thrown in prison for his role in the Pullman Railway Strike (also known as the “Debs Rebellion”).
Read more.
Today in Labor History – May 21st
Italian activists and anarchists Nicola Sacco and Bartolomeo Vanzetti, widely believed to have been framed for murder, went on trial
Read more.
Today in Labor History – May 20th
The first American public school was established in Dorchester, Massachusetts. – 1639 The Railway Labor Act was enacted in the
Read more.
Today in Labor History – May 19th
An explosion in Coal Creek, Tennessee killed 184 miners. – 1902 Ten people were killed when coal company officials in
Read more.